Jesse King, 1805-1868

Jesse King was born in Ohio (probably in the vicinity of Chillicothe) in 1805, he was a son of Philip King and Mary Leah Wright, both of Pennsylvania. Philip King was a farmer, he married Leah Wright in 1801 in Somerset, PA, they had six children, of whom Jesse was the third. The King family emigrated to Fairfield County, OH, when Jesse was a small boy. During the War of 1812, Jesse’s father, Philip King, served as a soldier in Capt. James Taylor’s company from Ross County, OH. In 1831, Jesse married Catherine Sivey  in Fairfield County. After their marriage, they removed to Franklin County, OH where Jesse’s parents and many siblings were already living and farming. Jesse and Catherine were the parents of six sons, the four oldest born in Franklin, the other two in Mercer: William, Solomon, John, Philip, Henry, Jesse and Franklin, who died in infancy. After Philip King’s death in 1846, much of the King family, including Jesse and Catherine, removed to Van Wert County, to farm the 200+ acres she had previously purchased and the 40 acres of bounty land granted for Philip’s war service. Jesse purchased 160 acres in Mercer County, erected a log cabin, cleared his land and became a prominent farmer and citizen. Jesse filled the office of justice of the peace for eighteen years, was township trustee a number of times, and also held other offices in the county. Four of Jesse and Catherine’s sons served in OH units during the Civil War. One son, Philip, died of wounds received at the battle of Nashville, in December, 1864. Jesse was an active member of the United Brethern Church, holding at different times all its offices, he died at his home after contracting typhoid fever in 1868. 

What is Typhoid Fever?

Typhoid fever is a bacterial infection, spread by consuming food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person. Symptoms include a gradual onset of high fever, weakness, abdominal pain, constipation, and headaches. People may carry the bacterium without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others. Deaths from typhoid among soldiers in the Civil War exceeded those of any other cause.
Family Tree of Jesse King
Family tree of Jesse King, based on my research, as of December 2016

Probate Record

Jesse King was a 3rd great grandfather on my maternal line, I found his probate record online at Ancestry.com, ‘Ohio, Wills and Probate Records, 1786-1998’, Mercer County, Ohio, Court of Common Pleas, Record of Wills, Vol 1-4, 1825-1886, Case #1200. It consists of nearly 60 pages and covers 4 years of settlement, Jesse’s wife Catherine Sivey King was the executrix. There are several pages of particular interest:

  • Pages 4 and 5 are his will, item 4 of the will is a legacy for his granddaughter Susan Candice King, the daughter of his deceased son Philip who died in action at the battle of Nashville.
  • Page 18, the credits to the estate totaling nearly $5000, most of which are sale of land to the heirs.
  • Page 24, purchase of burial clothes.
  • Page 30, value of the estate totaling $4000 for the 160 acres of land and $99 for 3 horses and 24 sheep. (what about the cows and hogs?)
  • Page 31, debts due the estate, cash and gold on hand equaled about $2000.
  • Page 34, expenses or payments made by the estate totaling about $1200.
  • Page 54, $50 for grave stones.
  • Page 60, the estate ‘donates’ $600 to Henry H. King to make him equal to the other heirs with respect to money he gave prior to the death of his father Jesse.

Download Jesse King's probate documents

Here are 60 pages of documents relating to the probate of Jesse King’s estate in 1868.

King Farm House and Family Cemetery

King family cemetery is behind the house near the tree line on the west. Jesse and Catherine are buried here.

Jesse King 175 acre purchase of 1843

NE quadrant of Sec 1, twp 4 south, range 1 east
The King family farm house in Mercer County, OH sat next to Black Creek, namesake of the township.
The 175 acres purchased by Jesse King in 1843 was next to the St. Mary’s River.

Frank Takeo Flucawa

Born Takeo Furukawa on 15 March 1883 in Tottori-Ken, Tokyo, Japan, little is documented of his early childhood. Family oral history stories say that the young Takeo experienced hunger, poverty and the loss of his family. Additionally, the stories tell of friendship, spiritual learning and scholarship.

David L. Osborne: His Indianapolis Homes

My great grandfather, David Louis Osborne, lived at over 20 addresses around Indianapolis between 1876 and 1942. I thought it would be interesting to see all the old buildings and homes where he lived in my hometown of Indianapolis.

The Marriage of David and Jennie Osborne

My great grandfather, David Louis Osborne (1848-1942), was a widower with two young sons in 1886 when he married Jennie Warbington (1857-1918) in Minneapolis on the 27th of May. I decided it was time to put sources to the story.

Do You See A Resemblance?

While working on a family photo project I decided it would be fun to compare side-by-side my father and his parents, at similar ages, to try and discover a family resemblance.

Probate of Jesse King 1868

Jesse King was born in Ohio (probably in the vicinity of Chillicothe) in 1805, he was a son of Philip King and Mary Leah Wright, both of Pennsylvania. Philip King was a farmer, he married Leah Wright in 1801 in Somerset, PA, they had six children, of whom Jesse was the third.

Letter from Sarah Tucker Lafary

A handwritten letter from Sarah Tucker Lafary to the then president of the United States, Grover Cleveland. It was her last appeal for a War of 1812 pension, sadly the pension was denied. The letter gives a glimpse of a woman who had no formal education, a poor farmers wife, then widow, mother of nine, she probably just wanted some independence through an income of her own.

Laferre to LaFara: Unusual Name

52 Ancestors, in 52 Weeks – Week 3: Unusual Name
The surnames in my tree are typical of common western European names. However, the name that is unusual among these names is MY surname: LaFara.

Admiral Byrd: I’d Like to Meet…

52 Ancestors, in 52 Weeks – Week 4: I’d Like to Meet…
Richard E. Byrd, my sixth cousin, 3 times removed, was a famous aviator, in 1929 he flew to the South Pole. His story inspired me when I was young.

Luella Pressell: Surprise!

52 Ancestors, in 52 Weeks – Week 6: Surprise!
Just when you think you know everything about an ancestor, surprise! I thought I knew most everything about my paternal great grandfather David L. Osborne, 1848-1942.

Rumple Family Photo 1895

52 Ancestors, in 52 Weeks – Week 8: Family Photo
For all of us who are procrastinating about labeling photos I have one thing to say, “Be considerate of the genealogist of the future!” My maternal grandmother was very good about labeling old family photos, and there is one in particular I found very informative.

Conrad Rumple: Bachelor Uncle

52 Ancestors, in 52 Weeks – Week 10: Bachelor Uncle
My uncles are the marrying kind, sometimes more than once!
I had to go back four generations for a bachelor uncle, my great-great-great uncle Conrad Rumple, 1833-1911.
Conrad was an older brother to my great-great grandfather on my matrilineal line, William Rumple, 1839-1912.

George Lafary and Catherine Landon: Large Family

52 Ancestors, in 52 Weeks – Week 11: Large Family
My great-great grandparents, George Lafary and Catherine Landon, had a relatively small family, three of their six children survived to adulthood. However, they both came from large families of nine siblings and nearly all survived to marry and have children.

In The Paper

52 Ancestors, in 52 Weeks – Week 13: In The Paper
It’s fun to find articles in the paper mentioning one of my relatives. Mostly they are birth, marriage, divorce and death events. But, it’s the oddball articles in the papers I like the most.

Genealogy Brick Walls

52 Ancestors, in 52 Weeks – Week 14: Brick Wall
We all have a brick wall, that one ancestor who defies all research. I decided I would work at my brick walls by generation, I broke through the last of my 3rd great grandparent brick walls, now I am working on 4th great grandparents.

Catherine Landon: Out of Place

52 Ancestors, in 52 Weeks – Week 16: Out of Place
I realized I did not have a date of death for my great, great grandmother, Catherine Landon Lafary. A fresh search uncovered the date and much more. Out of place, but once discovered, everything fell into place.

Immigrant Ancestors, Fresh Start

52 Ancestors, in 52 Weeks – Week1: Fresh Start.
The varied reasons my European ancestors immigrated to North America for a fresh start.

William and Uva Lafara: Favorite Photo

I have many favorite photos among my collection of family artifacts. Currently, my favorite photo is of two little children from 1916 who were a complete mystery to me until last spring.

Close to Home

My grandparents. Earl and Pearl, met at church, close to home, in 1914,

So Far Away

My great-uncle Frank immigrated to the United States from Japan in 1905 to further his education, so far away

Same Name

I get excited when I discover an ancestor with the same name as a friend, or co-worker, or neighbor. Maybe we are related!